Fertile Materials Books LLC

ISBN: 9781158381470

Published: June 21st 2010

Paperback

30 pages


Description

Fertile Materials  by  Books LLC

Fertile Materials by Books LLC
June 21st 2010 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 30 pages | ISBN: 9781158381470 | 3.75 Mb

Chapters: Uranium-238, Plutonium-238, Uranium-234, Fertile Material, Plutonium-240, Thorium-232. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you canMoreChapters: Uranium-238, Plutonium-238, Uranium-234, Fertile Material, Plutonium-240, Thorium-232.

Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 29. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Uranium-238 (U-238) is the most common isotope of uranium found in nature. It is not fissile, but is a fertile material: it can capture a slow neutron and after two beta decays become fissile plutonium-239. U-238 is fissionable by fast neutrons, but cannot support a chain reaction because inelastic scattering reduces neutron energy below the range where fast fission is probable.

Around 99.284% of natural uranium is uranium-238, which has a half-life of 1.41 x 10 seconds (4.468 x 10 years, or 4.468 billion years). Depleted uranium has an even higher concentration of the U-238 isotope, and even low-enriched uranium, while having a higher proportion of the uranium-235 isotope, is still mostly U-238. Reprocessed uranium is also mainly U-238, with about as much uranium-235 as natural uranium, a comparable proportion of uranium-236, and much smaller amounts of other isotopes of uranium such as uranium-234 uranium-233, and uranium-232.

In a fission nuclear reactor, uranium-238 can be used to breed Pu-239, which itself can be used in a nuclear weapon or as a nuclear-reactor fuel supply. In fact, in a typical nuclear reactor, up to one-third of the generated power does come from the fission of Pu-239, which is not supplied as a fuel to the reactor, but rather, produced from U-238. U-238 is not usable directly as nuclear fuel, though it can produce energy via fast fission. In this process, a neutron that has an energy in excess of 1 MeV can cause the nucleus of U-238 to split in two. Depending on design, this process can contribute some one to ten percent of all fission reactions in a reactor, but too few of the about 1.7 ne...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=481862



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