Eaten the Japanese: The Memoir of an Unknown Indian Prisoner of War by John Baptist Crasta

ISBN: 9788187185017

Published:

Hardcover

102 pages


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Eaten  by  the Japanese: The Memoir of an Unknown Indian Prisoner of War by John Baptist Crasta

Eaten by the Japanese: The Memoir of an Unknown Indian Prisoner of War by John Baptist Crasta
| Hardcover | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 102 pages | ISBN: 9788187185017 | 7.43 Mb

An unusual story of father-son collaboration. This story, hitherto largely unknown because of the authors poverty and obscurity, and his sons political incorrectness, is now presented by his son, the author Richard Crasta, through the e-bookMoreAn unusual story of father-son collaboration.

This story, hitherto largely unknown because of the authors poverty and obscurity, and his sons political incorrectness, is now presented by his son, the author Richard Crasta, through the e-book format.Will it bring the dead author the justice he was denied? Or to the thousands of Indians who were beaten, abused, starved, tortured, and killed--and in a few cases, eaten, like some of President George H.W.

Bushs comrades--while being prisoners of war of the Japanese during the second World War, only to be forgotten by the British as well as by their own country after the war?The story is especially memorable because it was written by a relatively low-ranking soldier just after his return from the war in 1946, and published 51 years later by his son, who by then had already published two books of his own. The story of a sons discovery of his fathers story and his complex feelings about rediscovering his father through it- it is a different kind of story, one that all fathers and sons can relate to.Or, as Barry Fruchter said, of his own feelings about his father Striking and raw, an antidote to myth.

Something to be treasured. This is the kind of record that this generation is losing fast, and we need to hold on to this. It made me think of what had happened to my own fathers memoirs, which were lost.A tale of unmitigated horror. A handsome tribute to a man of courage and rectitude.--Khushwant SinghThe theater of the absurd .

. . war as seen from the smoking trenches. Written without rancour or hatred, of archival value to historians. Bloodcurdling references to acts of cannibalism. Crastas memoir should find a cherished place in all major libraries.--Dr.

Arunachalam Kumar, Author, in Morning News.



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